Jan 25

It’s burning? What now?

A Second Life language lesson using a simulation

As part of the “Teaching Languages in a Virtual World” session, I gave a demo lesson using a kitchen fire simulations (this is a Swiss project and you can reed more about in English here und auf deutsch hier).

The following is a report on of this event including

– an outline of the lesson

– necessary preparations for the teacher

– video recordings of the discussion stage in the lesson

– video recordings of the discussion afterwards including teachers and language  learners.

This is a type of lessons that even teachers who are very new to Second Life and have little or no own resources can do.

Preparation

– fire pits, logs to sit on, fire extinguisher (this is all optional)

– notecard with instructions (placed in firepit(s))

– story and questions for pre-task

Lesson outline

1. Pre-task – 20 – 30 min

Invite everybody to sit around the fire.

SL TLVW Kitchen fire 2010_005

Lead into the lesson by telling a person story:

I like sitting around an open fire and chatting with friends…

But, sometimes things can get out of control. As a kid I was told not to play with fire.  Unfortunately, I didn’t listen and one day, when I was alone, I decided to cook something. But then I got caught up in play and forgot about the food on the stove. There was lots of smoke billowing out of the open window and the neighbours called the fire brigade. Fortunately, they weren’t angry with me but happy that I was all right.

Then ask some of the following questions and encourage students to speak:

Have you ever experienced a fire? Would you like to tell us very briefly?

Have you ever had to extinguish fire? How did you do it? If you saw a fire, what would you do? How would you react? Would you try to extinguish it yourself or call the fire department?

Do you know of any dos and don’ts when trying to put off a fire?

2. Field trip to the simulation – 20 – 30 min

-> Click the firepit to get the notecard with instructions

-> Go through instructions, clarify questions.

Fieldtrip to a Kitchen Fire Simulation

Second Life is an immersive environment and is therefore, often used for simulations that would be too expensive, too dangerous or plain impossible in the physical world (also often called Real Life).

Today, you are going to visit and experience a simulation of a kitchen fire. You will be placed in a situation where a kitchen fire starts and will have to decide how to react. The simulation will show you what the result of your reaction would be and whether it was a good decision or not.

Once you arrive at the location, accept the notecard with instructions that you will be offered in the blue pop-up menu.

Do the simulation together with your partner or your group and decide together how to react. You can do it a 2nd or 3rd time to try out different options.

—-> Make sure you have all the ambient sounds turned up for the best experience (see snapshot)

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Think about the following questions while there and take some notes for yourself after the simulation has finished:

1.  How did you feel when you first saw the fire start?  What was your first reaction?

2.  Are you happy with the way you reacted, or do you think you should have done something differently?  What?

3. Do you think that such a simulation in Second Life can be effective in training people for real life emergencies?

4. Did you learn anything about kitchen fires or how to react correctly in such a situation that you didn’t know before? What?

(Note that this is quite a realistic simulation that could be rather stressful for someone, especially if they have already experienced a fire. If it makes you feel uneasy, remember that you are in control and can leave the simulation at any time or teleport away).

Once back from the simulation, you will report about your experience with the simulations to your class members using your notes above to help you.

Here is the LM:

If it is a large group, one group goes first. Those outside can hear what is being said and can use their camera controls to observe what is happening inside. They are asked to take notes to give language feedback later.

SL TLVW Kitchen fire 2010_012

SL TLVW Kitchen fire 2010_008

Do the activity again with reversed roles.

SL TLVW Kitchen fire 2010_014


SL TLVW Kitchen fire 2010_015

SL TLVW10 Kitchen Fire_001

3. Discussion + language work – 30 -45 min

Say: Before we speak about our experience, we’ll do a quick vocabulary exercise.

You have heard and read many words and expressions related to fire. For the the next task you have 1 minute. I’d like you ALL to type into text chat as many words and expressions as you can related to fire. Start now!

Words that were listed in the demo lesson:

JunCar Static: fire extinguisher

– telephone

– smoke

– burn, escape, help, put out a fire, call

– 999

– water

– fire department

– match

– hose

Werka Ferina: fire brigade

Jim Gustafson: extinguisher

Rhonwen Beresford: brilliant intense incandescent

San Krokus: extinguisher

San Krokus: put out

Jim Gustafson: blanket

San Krokus: firefighters

Werka Ferina: fire extinguisher

Heather8 Devin: fire blanket

Jim Gustafson: fire alarm

Alexandra Ergenthal: alarm, rescue, extinguish, blanket, oil/ grease fire

San Krokus: water

Jim Gustafson: smoke detector

Anza Rosenblum: fire brigade

Anza Rosenblum: put out

Misha Writer: danger, heat, burn

amal Cliassi: fryer

San Krokus: emergency

JunCar Static: burn

Alexandra Ergenthal: escape, fire brigade,roll on the floor

Heimlaga Svenska: smoke

Anza Rosenblum: explosion

JunCar Static: fire extinguisher

Heimlaga Svenska: heat

Jim Gustafson: heat

Alexandra Ergenthal: oven, electrical, water

nahiram Vaniva: arsonist?

Werka Ferina: fear

Astra Martian: hot oil

amal Cliassi: flame

Astra Martian: burning

Astra Martian: blanket

Heimlaga Svenska: alarm sounds

Alexandra Ergenthal: fire hose

Clarify meaning, pronunciation and use of some of the words.

Depending on time and students’ needs work with these words some more or leave this to the language focus stage.

Divide the students into pairs or small groups for the discussion.

They discuss the questions on the notecard (see above).

Teacher monitors and takes notes.

(If possible record these conversations. I will right in a separate post how and also how they can be used for feedback and language work).

Ask everyone to come back together. Some students report about their discussions if times allows for it.

4. Feedback and language focus stage

Peer feedback, teacher feedback, language work according to student’s needs which emerged (We skipped this in the demo lesson).

Extended tasks (after the sessions)

(I usually give the option of doing this in writing or orally)

– report about their experience

– report about a real experience with fire

– answer one of the questions above in more detail

– create a presentation or video about a topic related to fire and safety

– do a role-play and maybe record it (as a machinima)

– write a safety leaflet

Discussion with teachers and learners about the lesson

How did they like it? Ideas for improvements. How they experienced it as a learner. Difficulties…

Your feedback on the lesson and what you heard in the recorded discussion is very welcome.